Makepeace Productions
As Nutayunean
 

We Still Live Here
awarded "Moving Mountains
Prize" at Telluride's MountainFilm and takes "Full Frame Inspiration Award"
in Durham

    WE STILL LIVE HERE
       (Âs Nutayuneân)

tells a remarkable story of cultural revival by the Wampanoag of Southeastern Massachusetts. Their ancestors ensured the survival of the Pilgrims in New England, and lived to regret it. Now they are saying loud and clear in their Native tongue, Âs Nutayuneân—
We Still Live Here.


WE STILL LIVE HERE TRAVELS TO BRAZIL!

Take a virtual trip to varied regions of Brazil with We Still Live Here which recentlly traveled to four fantastic venues, from an Amazon village to the modern capital of Brasilia.
Read Anne's blog which features wonderful trip details and four fabulous Facebook Photo Albums!


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"There is nothing I know of that's anything like the Wampanoag case."
— Noam Chomsky


Complete Screenings

Visit the Screenings Page for a complete list of all upcoming and previous screenings of
We Still Live Here


NANTUCKET'S CHANNEL 22 INTERVIEW
WITH ANNE MAKEPEACE

Interview-Anne Makepeace-Nantucket, August 2012


VIEW FILM CLIPS

 

VISIT OUR COMPANION WEBSITE
OurMotherTongues.org

Explore Native American language programs from Alask to North Carolina, including the Wôpanâak Language Reclamation Project featured in
We Still Live Here — Âs Nutayuneân
ourmothertongues.org




Click for PRESS MATERIALS
Click for REVIEWS
Click for OUTREACH INFORMATION
Click for COMPLETE SCREENINGS


The story begins in 1994 when Jessie Little Doe, an intrepid, thirty-something Wampanoag social worker, began having recurring dreams: familiar-looking people from another time addressing her in an incomprehensible language. Jessie was perplexed and a little annoyed– why couldn’t they speak English? Later, she realized they were speaking Wampanoag, a language no one had used for more than a century. These events sent her and members of the Aquinnah and Mashpee Wampanaog communities on an odyssey that would uncover hundreds of documents written in their language, lead Jessie to a Masters in Linguistics at MIT, and result in something that had never been done before – bringing a language alive again in an American Indian community after many generations with no Native speakers.*

itvs wgby cpb sundance
nsf masshumanities lef
We Still Live Here is a co-production of MAKEPEACE LLC, and the Independent Television Service (ITVS), produced in association with WGBY, with funding provided by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB). Additional funding was provided by the Sundance Documentary Fund, the National Science Foundation, LEF, MFH, et al.

*All tribal member interviews are personal opinions and do not represent the view of the Wampanoag Tribe of Gay Head (Aquinnah).